18 August 2017

STAINED GLASS SHARDS - A COLOURFUL ART


Glass is a simple and yet complex material that has been around for centuries. From stain glass, blown glass, to using is in insulation it is still heavily relied on in today's everyday life depending on it's application.

When it comes to stained glass, it has such mystical beauty. They have rich and vibrant colours, so as when the sun light illuminates them in the backdrop, they demand your attention. The metaphoric language is skillfully soldered together from shards to depicted a story mostly recognized in churches and cathedrals. With the ghastly figures of Christianity staring down from high above, you can't help but feel you're being watched. Or abstract patterns split in colour are nothing less than mesmerizing. Whatever the genre, I feel that it is the richness of mineral and sand heated are the elements in which creates the mystical feel to the art.

"Stained glass is a material that has been coloured by adding metallic salts during its manufacture. The coloured glass is crafted into stained glass windows in which small pieces of glass are arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead and supported by a rigid frame."1.


"A COLLAGE OF SPECTRUM
REFRACTING SPIRITUAL CONUNDRUMS.


GAZING UP TO THOSE

IN HUMBLE REFLECTION.


PRAYING BEFORE IDOLS

A FALSE REMNANTS OF POPULATION.

ILLUMINATE AND BE FINAL

TO WAIVER SOULLESS TRENDS."

So, with the times, the culture of "going to Church" on Sunday has been on the steady decline in the lasts few decades. To the point now you are seeing Churches going up for sale and being either torn down or converted into housing.

Why is this? Well there is a disconnect between the Church and the populous, maybe because more and more people are becoming highly educated, questioning the existence of a higher being. There are still educated people who do believe in a higher being, yet you can't deny that there isn't declined in Church attendance.

footnotes:


1. searched - stained glass history

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